Want peace, be ready for war: Russian publication addresses armament race between Armenia and Azerbaijan

Want peace, be ready for war: Russian publication addresses armament race between Armenia and Azerbaijan


Armenia and Azerbaijan seem to have started a race of arms and armament, and as opposed to previous years, both countries are emphasizing the creation of a domestic military-industrial complex, rather than importing from abroad.

Russian Argumenty Nedeli (Week's Arguments) publication wrote earlier that Turkey and Azerbaijan had agreed over joint production of infantry rifles and 105 mm caliber cannons, further cooperation implying the creation of also 120 mm caliber ones. (Week’s Argument, widely held as a reputable weekly is published in Russia, CIS, with circulation 570,000 copies)

The same publication reports that Baku is planning to manufacture also antitank guided missiles. Besides, Azerbaijan has been invited to participate in the Turkish national project on developing Altay third-generation main battle tanks.

During the Israeli president's state visit to Azerbaijan, an agreement was reached to start building military plants, production of military technologies, as well as procurement of armaments for the needs of the Azeri army. A preliminary agreement was reached with Israeli Aeronautics Defense Systems Ltd on the construction of a plant to manufacture reconnaissance and unmanned military aircrafts, as well as spy satellites that can be used for military purposes.

Another Israeli defense company Elta Systems Ltd will be cooperating with Azerbaijan in creation of satellite systems. In addition, serial production of Russian Kalashnikov assault rifles has been launched in Azerbaijan.

At the same time, the publication points out that “Armenia is not exactly idly sitting by either. Recently a Program on the development of military equipment and armament for 2011-2015 has been adopted, providing not only for import of weapon but also development of an Armenian military-industrial complex”.

Argumenty Nedeli also reminded that last year a multi-member Russian delegation visited Armenia and negotiated the terms of further development of military-technical cooperation between the two countries:

“It has become known that nine Russian-Armenian joint weapon manufacturing plants will be built in Armenia in the nearest future. Experts believe that besides ammunition the plants will produce also heavy military equipment.”

The Armenian Program on the development of military equipment and armament for 2011-2015
was adopted last December during the special session of the National Security Council summoned by Armenian president Serzh Sargsyan.

Secretary of the Armenian National Security Council Arthur Baghdasaryan stressed that the approved program would become a new incentive to spur defense industry in Armenia. The necessary paper-work has been completed within the past several months, and so far Moscow has ratified 35 documents of great importance to Armenia.

“Experts believe that all facts point to Baku's and Yerevan's preparations to a long-term confrontation in Nagorno Karabakh. Most probably, in case of launch of active hostilities, the world community would impose an embargo on armament supply to the conflict zone. And imported equipment and ammunition might not last long [thus the need for domestic production],” writes the Russian publication.